News

11.08.2016

A behind the scenes look at our work on the Pergamon project can be found in the article

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27.05.2016

Pedro Santos interviewed by RESTAURO: Virtual 3D Model of Pergamon Altar

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On the occasion of the public unveiling of the Pergamon Altar's 3D model, the German Newspaper for Conservation and Restoration RESTAURO (Zeitschrift für Konservierung und Restaurierung RESTAURO) spoke with Pedro Santos, head of the Competence Center for Cultural Heritage Digitization at Fraunhofer IGD. Santos and his team scanned the altar in the Antique Collection of the National Museums in Berlin (Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung) in September 2014. 


Unfortunately, the interview is only available in German.

24.05.2016

Public unveiling of the Pergamon Altar’s 3D model

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Per­ga­mo­nal­tar, An­sicht des Gi­gan­ten­fr­ie­ses am Nord­ri­sal­it. Über das Render­ing mit Au­to­desk 3DS Max ist der Fr­ies in ei­ner vir­tu­el­len Be­leuch­tungs­si­t­ua­ti­on zu se­hen. Foto: Staat­li­che Mu­se­en zu Ber­lin, An­ti­kensamm­lung/ Fraun­ho­fer IGD
Per­ga­mo­nal­tar, An­sicht des Gi­gan­ten­fr­ie­ses am Nord­ri­sal­it. Über das Render­ing mit Au­to­desk 3DS Max ist der Fr­ies in ei­ner vir­tu­el­len Be­leuch­tungs­si­t­ua­ti­on zu se­hen. Foto: Staat­li­che Mu­se­en zu Ber­lin, An­ti­kensamm­lung/ Fraun­ho­fer IGD

Within the scope of the “Museum Island” master plan, the Pergamon Museum is being renovated in sections. Work began in 2013, and the Pergamon hall has been closed since the fall of 2014, presumably until 2019. With the support of the federal government’s commissioner for culture and the media, the Antique Collection of the National Museums in Berlin and Fraunhofer IGD were able to realize an elaborate 3D scan of the over 2000-year-old masterpiece of Hellenistic art in September 2014. The resulting 3D model of the Pergamon Altar is now unveiled to the public.

From laser scan to 3D model

The scan was performed under the direction of Pedro Santos, head of the Competence Center for Cultural Heritage Digitization of Fraunhofer IGD, over a two-week period prior to the hall’s closing. In the first week, Fraunhofer researchers planned and prepared its execution in cooperation with the Berlin museums.In the second week, during the day, Santos and his colleagues focused on the photogrammetric recording of the 113-meter-long Gigantomachy frieze. At night, they captured the entire hall, including all friezes and colonnades, by means of a 3D laser scanner. Digitization was completed on September 29, 2014, the last day the hall was open to public.

A laser scanner was placed at 51 scanning positionsyielding 176 million 3D points per measurement. By doing so, they achieved a resolution of 5 millimeters. Based on a pre-computed matrix, the Gigantomachy frieze was automatically photographed line by line and column by column every 63 cm horizontally and every 50 cm vertically, with overlaps in five directions (centrally as well as diagonally from the top, left, bottom and right side). For this purpose, immediately prior to the mission, the team combined an 8-meter-long mobile boom with a movable head to position and orient the reflex camera. In the process, a total of 8,065 2D color images with 24.2 megapixels per image were created. A 3D model of the frieze with a resolution of 300 micrometers was computed from this set of images.

Both scanning results have now been combined in a 3D model comprising around 90 gigabytes, in its highest resolution, and including about 580 million triangles. The model was first presented to the public on May 24, 2016, and is now available for numerous applications in research, museum presentation, or reproduction. Until the renovation is complete, while waiting to do so in person, visitors can now visit the Pergamon Altar online. In addition to the presentation of the overall model, different detail models are to be made available, as shown in this example of the South frieze.

Digitization of Cultural Heritage

With its competence center for cultural heritage digitization, Fraunhofer IGD places one of its focuses on the development of new technologies to preserve and document cultural assets and their virtual reproductions. The Competence Center was founded in 2012 and specializes in fast and economic digitization capturing historical cultural heritage in three dimensions. Within the scope of the BMWi project “CultLab3D” and coordinated by Fraunhofer IGD, their researchers developed the fully automated 3D scanning facility by the same name for the mass digitization of cultural artifacts.

Furthermore, Fraunhofer IGD launched the “Culture in 3D” Forum in 2011, providing museums, industrial partners, scientists, and industry representatives with a platform for the exchange of ideas on the potential of 3D technologies, as well as on the resulting options of exhibiting cultural goods, preserving them, and making them available for research purposes.

Fraunhofer IGD is an active member of the Cultural Heritage Research Alliance founded in 2008. It actively promotes the protection of cultural heritage by developing new procedures, materials, and technologies. The interdisciplinary alliance was founded by the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, and the Leibniz Association.

IGD press release

Pergamon3D-Webviewer

Berlin State Museums

Pergamon Altar 3D - Video

15.04.2016

HMI 2016: Fraunhofer 3D scanning technology facilitates fully automated digitization

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3D models of objects can enhance online stores. However, 3D scans are time-consuming and cost-intensive. Fraunhofer IGD will present a solution for the mass digitization of 3D objects at this year’s Hanover Fair.

(Darmstadt/Rostock/Graz) Owners of online stores rely on image material. Photos on the internet will show the customers what the product to be ordered looks like. However, this is often a very superficial assessment. If, instead, you can take an object off the virtual shelf and look at it from all angles as a 3D model, the customer benefits. For such a 3D online store to be realized, the objects first need to be scanned. “With the fully automated scanning facility CultLab3D, this is economically and expeditiously feasible”, explains Pedro Santos of Fraunhofer IGD.

Santos and his team originally developed the scanning facility for the digitization of cultural artifacts. For the millions upon millions of artifacts preserved by museums, the usual recording by means of manually positioned 3D scanners cannot be mastered and is nearly unaffordable. In the past three years, an option was created with CultLab3D to digitize small to medium-sized objects in a fully automated manner. For this purpose, the cultural artifacts or products are placed on a perspex tray and taken to the first scanning station on a conveyor belt. There, industrial cameras installed on a mobile camera arc and below the tray capture the artifact with a great number of high-resolution 2D images from different angles.

A first 3D model can already be computed from these images. The procedure is called photogrammetry. Based on this first model, an intelligent robot arm works at a second station. It is equipped with a camera and able to efficiently and quickly photograph all those spots the scanning arc was not able to capture. Any possible gaps in the 3D model are thus closed. “Capturing geometry and texture takes about 10 minutes”, explains Santos. “The 3D model is finished after about another 30 minutes.”

At Hanover Fair, the scanning facility for cultural artifacts and industrial applications can be seen in Hall 2 Booth C28 with the Federal Ministry of Economics from April 25 through 29.

Fraunhofer IGD - Press release

07.03.2016

Hesse’s Minister of Economic Affairs interested in new trends in digitization

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Hessischer Wirtschaftsminister informiert sich über Digitalisierung
Hessischer Wirtschaftsminister informiert sich über Digitalisierung

On February 24, Tarek Al-Wazir, Hesse's State Minister of Economic Affairs, was provided with information on current research projects and developments in the field of digitization.

The internet and the digital age change our economy, our daily lives and our society. Hence, the Minister of Economics of the German State of Hesse Tarek Al-Wazir went on a "digitization tour" through the Rhine-Main region in order to familiarize himself with innovative projects, research plans and digital business ideas. At the "Wohn- und Quartierzentrum" in Weiterstadt, a center for living near Darmstadt, Al-Wazir gained insight into smart homes which support inhabitants in their daily lives. Fraunhofer IGD makes technological contributions to this center for living.

At Fraunhofer IGD in Darmstadt, researchers pointed out further possible use cases for their technologies and applications.

3D digitization
The department for Cultural Heritage Digitization develops fast and economic digitization methods for virtual, true-to-life reproductions of real objects. During the digitization process, the object's geometry, texture as well as optical material properties are captured automatically. On February 24, the department's researchers demonstrated their fully-automated 3D scanning pipeline CultLab3D to the State Minister.

3D color print
Three-dimensional objects, such as a museum's Roman vase, cannot only be scanned but also "printed" by a special printer. Unlike a conventional printer, this one does not "spit out" a piece of paper but a real object. In order to make this object as color-fast as possible, researchers at Fraunhofer have developed their universal 3D printing pipeline Cuttlefish. Their guest Al-Wazir was presented with the products of printing.

10.12.2015

Preserving our cultural heritage with Fraunhofer innovations

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Sixteen Fraunhofer Institutes, the Dresden State Art Collections (Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, SKD) and the Saxon State and University Library Dresden (Sächsische Landesbibliothek – Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Dresden, SLUB) will cooperate on various research projects concerning the preservation and restoration of Saxony's precious cultural heritage within the next three years.

Professor Reimund Neugebauer, President of the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, declares, "The protection and preservation of our cultural heritage is of great concern to the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft since the loss of such heritage goods is irreversible. Therefore, we will provide a total of 1.5 million euros for the next three years. In order to save our cultural goods, sustainable strategies for the future and innovative technologies are required, using the funding available for the preservation of cultural heritage as efficiently as possible.

The pilot project consists of four sub-projects which focus on different technologies and fields of application. Fraunhofer IGD is coordinator of the subproject "Novel digital material and damage analysis in 3D". Within this frame, multiple new methods developed by Fraunhofer are combined in order to implement the acquisition, processing and presentation of data collected from the sculptures in the Dresden collection. During the digitization process, information on the surface, the volume and the material properties are collected, resulting in a quantitative and functional 3D model. This model consolidates and visualizes the 3D surface scan (geometry, texture and optical material properties) with information from inside the sculptures (volumetric data, ultrasound and terahertz waves). Hence, digital models both valuable for restoration projects as well as education and exhibition purposes emerge.

22.09.2015

Preserving our cultural heritage digitally

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Cultural treasures are endangered by terror and other hazards worldwide. A means of preserving our cultural heritage are 3D scan technologies. With CultLab3D, Fraunhofer IGD can offer one solution which is presented to the world in Granada at the end of September.

(Darmstadt/Rostock/Graz) Terrorists do not only commit atrocities against human beings around the world. Their destructiveness aiming at culturally and historically invaluable sites and objects is equally excessive and inapprehensible. Hence, there is a great desire to preserve these cultural treasures – at least digitally in 3D – in order to be able to rebuild them one day, should the situation arise. Even those artifacts which find themselves in supposed safety are not protected for eternity.

Catastrophes such as the collapse of Cologne’s municipal archive make it clear that there is no absolute safety, even in museums. "Additionally, not even the best conservation is able to eliminate the fact that artifacts age and lose parts of their original properties”, Pedro Santos, head of Fraunhofer IGD's department "Cultural Heritage Digitization", explains. "Hence, 3D digitization is a great tool for capturing the current state of preservation."

With millions and millions of cultural heritage artifacts conserved in museums, the common manner of acquisition using 3D scanners positioned by hand is not able to cope and virtually unaffordable. In the past three years, Santos and his team of researchers have therefore developed the scanning pipeline CultLab3D, which henceforth allows small to medium-sized objects to be scanned automatically. Artifacts are placed on a tray made of Plexiglas and are transported to the first scanning station by a conveyor belt. At this point the artifact is captured by industrial cameras mounted on a mobile arc and underneath the tablet, taking high-resolution 2D pictures from different view angles.

A first 3D model can already be generated from these images. This method is called photogrammetry. Based on the first model, an intelligent robotic arm is in operation at the second station of the scanning pipeline. This arm is equipped with another camera and is able to quickly and efficiently photograph the areas which could not entirely be captured by the arc. In this way, potential gaps in the 3D model are closed. "Capturing the geometry and texture takes around 10 minutes", Santos explains. "After about 30 more minutes, the final 3D model is available."

Form 28th September until 2nd October Fraunhofer researchers are presenting CultLab3D at the Digital Heritage Conference in Granada, Spain. The Digital Heritage is the largest symposium on the digitization of cultural heritage worldwide. Accordingly, the expectations placed on Fraunhofer’s innovations are extremely high. "We will be presenting CultLab3D running fully automatically and continuously for the first time ever", Santos says. "There are always going to be two artifacts on the scanning pipeline and we will have nothing more to do than to place the objects on the scanning pipeline and to remove them again."

27.08.2015

CultLab3D nominated for PR image of the year

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Die Scanstraße CultLab3D des Fraunhofer IGD in der Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung. Der
Die Scanstraße CultLab3D des Fraunhofer IGD in der Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung. Der

CultLab3D, the world's singular 3D scanning pipeline for cultural heritage artifacts, was in operation at the Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung's Medieval Hall in Frankfurt from July 21 to 27, 2014. One of the publicity photographs is now nominated for PR image of the year.

In Frankfurt, Fraunhofer researchers digitized cultural heritage artifacts in a fully automated manner for the first time. CultLab3D opens entirely new possibilities for scientific research in museums. With the scanning pipeline CultLab3D, collection objects can be captured in 3D in just a few minutes and visualised in the form of true-to-life digital models.

One of the publicity photographs captured on this occasion has been nominated for the PR image award in the categoy "Produktfoto" ("product picture"). It shows the "Apollo Belvedere"(1497/98) by Renaissance sculptor Pier Jacobo Alari Bonacolsi (ca. 1460-1528), called Antico, on the mobile digitization lab at Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung‘s Medieval Hall.


You can vote for CultLab3D here until the middle of October. The image can be found in the section "Produktfoto".

18.12.2014

Fraunhofer 3D scanning facility tried and true even in transportation

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Fraunhofer-3D-Scanstraße bewährt sich auch beim Transport
Fraunhofer-3D-Scanstraße bewährt sich auch beim Transport

 It has been done. For the first time, CultLab3D traveled overseas and back on an aircraft for application testing. The scanning facility thus did not only stand out with its digitalization procedure but also with its mobility.

(Darmstadt/Rostock/Graz) Even a researcher can be relieved at some point. “We made it”, rejoices Pedro Santos, head of the competence center “Cultural Heritage Digitization” at Fraunhofer IGDCultLab3Dmade it to Las Vegas, USA and back to Darmstadt in one piece. From December 2 through 4, 2014, the heart of the globally unique 3D scanning facility was available for application testing at the Autodesk University 2014. The Fraunhofer researchers thus took another step towards the global 3D digitalization of museum artifacts.

Nowadays, goods can be transported by airplane safely and fast. “Nevertheless, there was great concern about our state-of-the-art prototype being damaged over such a long distance”, says Santos. But the scanning facility survived everything well. “We are really relieved. Two years of development work have paid off.”

The full mobility of the scanning facility is an important point for its future use. Due to its modular structure, it can be broken down into small parts, packaged well and transported. This makes it possible to digitally capture cultural objects anywhere in the world. In the future, CultLab3D will be able to preserve the millions of existing artifacts for future generations cost-effectively, speedily and sustainably.

In the process, the researchers of Fraunhofer IGD are relying on the industrialization and automation of the entire 3D digitalization process by means of state-of-the-art scanning and lighting technologies. The system does not only capture geometry and texture of artifacts but also their optical material properties such as reflection and absorption behavior. So far, it has been very expensive and time-intensive to digitalize objects of art three-dimensionally. With CultLab3D, they may be scanned and archived in 3D within just a few minutes in the future.

About Autodesk University

Autodesk University provides users, developers and scientists with an opportunity to exchange information on the latest 2D and 3D technologies of the US software company Autodesk. In addition to its own photogrammetrical 3D reconstruction solutions, Fraunhofer IGD also connected Autodesk Recap Photo to CultLab3D.

Press release Fraunhofer IGD

06.11.2014

Open collection: Fraunhofer researchers are scanning dinosaur bones & co. in Berlin — and you can watch

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Die 3D-Scanstraße CultLab3D des Fraunhofer IGD mit einer Replik der Nofretete
Die 3D-Scanstraße CultLab3D des Fraunhofer IGD mit einer Replik der Nofretete

The 3D scanning system CultLab3D of Fraunhofer IGD will be tested at the Museum of Natural History in Berlin next week. This should explore the opportunities and challenges to digitalize natural and cultural goods quickly and efficiently. All interested parties are welcome at the panel discussion on 11 November 2014 and to visit the scanning system from 11 to 14 November 2014.

(Berlin/Darmstadt) European natural-history collections include hundreds of millions of collection objects available to science for research and comparative purposes. This information is essential for science and the management of natural resources. With the advent of computer technology, collection data have been increasingly digitized and integrated into networks since the turn of the century, where they are available for the scientific community today.

“Museum collections around the world offer invaluable biodiversity information. Free, open access to these resources is decisive for the promotion of biodiversity research and a better management of nature for a sustainable future. However, this is currently still immensely time-, staff- and cost-intensive”, explains Prof. Johannes Vogel, General Director of the Natural History Museum in Berlin. Here, a total of 30 million objects are stored, of which only a small portion has been digitized so far. With a new 3D digitalization procedure, the researchers of Fraunhofer IGD might be able to change this. Their 3D scanning system CultLab3D scans collection objects quickly, cost-effectively and in a fully automated fashion.

“Our technologies not only offer a faster digitalization, classification and archiving of museum inventory but also substitute expensive items on loan and physical copies for freely available virtual models” explains Pedro Santos of Fraunhofer IGD. In the coming week, the Natural History Museum in Berlin will test the possibilities of the 3D scanning system. What is feasible and where are the limits? Can large fossil dinosaur bones be scanned just as well as small alcohol-preserved fishs or almost transparent tiny crabs? All interested parties are invited to watch the test live from 11 to 14 November 2014 between 10:00 am and 4:00 pm.

Invitation for the panel discussion “Open collection: Opportunities and possibilities of 3D digitalization for research and society” on 11 November starting at 2:00 pm

Host:

Dr. Angelika Grosse, scientific journalist

Impulse:

Dr. Herbert Maschner, Idaho State University

“3D Visualization, Biodiversity, and the Great Extinctions:

Natural History Museums and Global Science”

Panel guests:

Dr. Dietrich Nelle, Assistant State Secretary, Federal Ministry for Education and Research

Prof. Dr. Dieter W. Fellner, Director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research (IGD)

Prof. Dr. Barbara Göbel, Director of the Ibero-American Institute, Prussian Heritage

Prof. Dr. Jean-Jacques Hublin, Director of the Human Evolution department, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Dr. Gregor Hagedorn, Head of Digital World, Natural History Museum

Dr. Tahani Nadim, International Fellow of the Federal Cultural Foundation at the Natural History Museum

Please register at evolution@mfn-berlin.de until 7 November 2014.

Contact:

Dr. Gesine Steiner, Public Relations, Tel. +49(0)30 2093 8917 Fax. +49(0)30 2093 8914, e-mail: gesine.steiner@mfn-berlin.de


14.10.2014

CultLab3D scan planets for children's film project

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Schüler der Christoph-Graupner-Schule am Fraunhofer IGD
Schüler der Christoph-Graupner-Schule am Fraunhofer IGD

With their singular 3D scanning pipeline CultLab3D, Fraunhofer IGD usually only scans cultural heritage artifacts. However, for a film project at the Christoph Graupner School in Darmstadt, Fraunhofer researchers scanned models of planets and space shuttles for the first time. The result was presented at the movie premiere on October 13 at the Centralstation Darmstadt.

30.09.2014

Invitation and program for the EVA Berlin Conference 2014

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EVA Berlin Konferenz 2014
EVA Berlin Konferenz 2014

Bereits zum 21. Mal wird vom 5. - 7. November 2014 die EVA Berlin Konferenz zum Thema „Elektronische Medien & Kunst, Kultur und Historie“ im Kunstgewerbemuseum Berlin am Kulturforum Potsdamer Platz (Matthäikirchplatz 8, 10785 Berlin) stattfinden.

Die EVA Berlin ist das jährliche Forum für elektronische Dokumentations- und Visualisierungstechniken im Kulturbereich. Erfolgreiche Digitalisierungsprojekte mit Bezug zum kulturellen Erbe, netzbasierte Forschungs- und Vermittlungskooperationen sowie innovative informationstechnische Serviceangebote für Museen, Bibliotheken und Archive werden praxisnah, anwendungsorientiert und in fachübergreifenden Zusammenhängen vorgestellt. Gedächtnisinstitutionen, Technologieentwickler, Informationswissenschaftler und öffentliche Verwaltungen treten in einen Diskurs über aktuelle Tendenzen und innovative Techniken in der digitalen Gesellschaft. Konferenz, Workshops und begleitende Ausstellung bieten vielfältig Gelegenheit zum Erfahrungsaustausch und Vorstellen neuer Verfahren und Produkte sowie zur Vorbereitung kooperativer Zusammenarbeit.

Inhaltlicher Schwerpunkt der diesjährigen EVA ist die 3D-Digitalisierung, Dokumentation und Präsentation von historischem Kulturgut:

Mittwoch, 5. November 2014 | 9.30-12.30 Uhr
Workshop I: 3D-Scanning von historischem Kulturgut – Technologien und Anwendungsbereiche

Mittwoch, 5. November 2014 | 13.30-16.30 Uhr
Workshop II: Forum „Kultur in 3D“: Kooperationen, Positionen und Projekte
Workshop III: Attention! Wahrnehmung und Vermittlung in der digitalen Gesellschaft

Donnerstag, 6. November 2014 | 09.30-13.00 Uhr sowie 15.00-18.00 Uhr
Konferenz I
Session 1: Kultur in 3D – Akquirieren, Modellieren, Visualisieren
Session 2: Kultur in 3D – Virtuelle Archäologie
Session 3: Geschichte digital – Nachweissysteme und Dokumentationsstrategien
Session 4: Gesellschaft digital – vom Hören und Sehen

Freitag, 7. November 2014 | 09.30-13.00 Uhr
Konferenz II
Session 5: Kulturerbe digital – in Netzwerk und Verbund
Session 6: Bildwelten digital – immer nur Bilder?

Donnerstag, 6. November 2014
Ganztägige Ausstellung

Weiterführende Informationen zum Programm und Konferenzgebühren:
www.eva-berlin.de

Die Konferenz richtet sich an Museen, Bibliotheken, Archive und deren Verbände, Kultur- und Bildungsministerien, Denkmalämter, weitere kulturell orientierte Institutionen, Forschungsstätten der Bildverarbeitung, Computergraphik und Informations- und Medienwissenschaften sowie Anbieter von Multimedia- und Bildverarbeitungssystemen, Hard- und Software, Online- Informationsdiensten und Datenbanken.

Wir freuen uns über Ihre Teilnahme. Für Ihre Anmeldung bis zum 24.10.2014 nutzen Sie bitte das Registrierungssystem auf der EVA Berlin Webseite:
www.eva-berlin.de/teilnahme/anmeldung.html

Kontakt:
Constanze Fuhrmann
Fraunhofer-Institut für Graphische Datenverarbeitung IGD
Fraunhoferstr. 5
64283 Darmstadt, Germany
T + 49 6151 155-620
constanze.fuhrmann@igd.fraunhofer.de
www.igd.fraunhofer.de
Die EVA Berlin ist eine Kooperation der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin, Preußischer Kulturbesitz und dem Fraunhofer-Institut für Graphische Datenverarbeitung IGD, Abteilung Digitalisierung von Kulturerbe.

05.09.2014

CultLab3D shown on RTL Hessen

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Die 3D-Scanstraße CultLab3D
Die 3D-Scanstraße CultLab3D

With its singular 3D scanning pipeline CultLab3D, Fraunhofer IGD is now able to scan cultural heritage artifacts in a fully-automated, cost-effective and fast manner in order to archive objects for eternity. How this works was shown on the German TV channel RTL Hessen on August 3.

Fraunhofer IGD's 3D scanning pipeline CultLab3D was one of the topics featured in RTL Hessen's program on August 3. With the unique, automated digitization system CultLab3D, Fraunhofer IGD relies on the industrialization and automation of the entire 3D digitization process of artifacts by means of the latest scanning and lighting technologies. Up to now it has been very expensive and time-consuming to digitize works of art in 3D. With this system, cultural artifacts can henceforth be archived in form of a detailed 3D scan.

Click here to watch RTL Hessen's TV program.

27.07.2014

Fraunhofer technology thrills Frankfurt museum

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Der „Apoll vom Belvedere“ (1497/98) von Renaissance-Bildhauer Pier Jacobo Alari Bonacolsi (um 1460–1528), genannt Antico, auf dem mobilen Digitalisierungslabor CultLab3D des Fraunhofer IGD im Mittelaltersaal der Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung. (Foto: Norbert Miguletz; © Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung)
Der „Apoll vom Belvedere“ (1497/98) von Renaissance-Bildhauer Pier Jacobo Alari Bonacolsi (um 1460–1528), genannt Antico, auf dem mobilen Digitalisierungslabor CultLab3D des Fraunhofer IGD im Mittelaltersaal der Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung. (Foto: Norbert Miguletz; © Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung)

Disasters are threatening historic cultural treasures. For the first time last week, Fraunhofer researchers automated 3D reconstruction of artifacts in the Frankfurt Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung, making them accessible for eternity.

(Frankfurt am Main/Darmstadt) CultLab3D, the world’s unique 3D scanning facility for cultural artifacts, was in operation inside the Medieval Room of the Frankfurt Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung from July 21th to 27th 2014. CultLab3D, developed by Fraunhofer IGD, is to revolutionize the needed 3D digitization of cultural artifacts. The artifacts, threatened by environmental influences and disasters, are secured in their current state of preservation and at the same time are made accessible to international research.

So far, this process has been very expensive and time-consuming. With CultLab3D, the Fraunhofer researchers are relying on the industrialization and automation of the entire 3D digitization process of artifacts by means of state-of-the-art scan and illumination techniques. The mobile digitization laboratory thus allows for the millions of existing artifacts to be scanned and archived in an industrial, cost-effective and fast manner.

With their CultLab3D, the Fraunhofer researchers are digitizing genuine cultural artifacts for the first time in a fully automated way in Frankfurt. “In this test run, we gained a great number of very valuable insights”, says Martin Ritz of Fraunhofer IGD. “The properties of the different sculptures but also the conditions in the museum operation are providing us with some important impulses to further develop CultLab3D.” This is how the researchers managed, among other challenges, to apply the automated scanning process with industrial cameras to very dark and low-contrast objects as well. In the process, CultLab3D does not only capture geometry and texture of artifacts but also their optical material properties such as reflection and absorption behavior. This allows for a photo-realistic 3D illustration.

So far, 3D scans of art treasures have entailed laborious and cost-intensive manual labor for the most part. Due to the higher speed, the Fraunhofer researchers aim to reduce the cost of 3D scans tenfold to twentyfold. The outlook of being able to digitize entire collections in the future is very welcome to Prof. Dr. Vinzenz Brinkmann, head of the collection of antiques at the Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung: “Whoever knows how we had to work before, will recognize the “miracle” of the scanning facility. Entirely new ways of scientific study will now open up to museums around the world.”

19.02.2014

CultLab3D at BMBF 2014 Digital Societies inaugural event

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Pedro Santos (Abteilungsleiter CC-CHD Fraunhofer IGD), Prof. Fellner (Direktor Fraunhofer IGD), Prof. Wanka (Bundesministerin für Bildung und Forschung), Prof. Neugebauer (Präsident Fraunhofer Gesellschaft)
Pedro Santos (Abteilungsleiter CC-CHD Fraunhofer IGD), Prof. Fellner (Direktor Fraunhofer IGD), Prof. Wanka (Bundesministerin für Bildung und Forschung), Prof. Neugebauer (Präsident Fraunhofer Gesellschaft)

The Federal Ministry of Education and Research has dedicated the year 2014 to the Digital Societies. The inaugural event was held February 19th. at the Berlin Museum for Communication under the auspices of the Federal Minister for Education and Research Prof. Wanka and assembled stakeholders from Industry, Politics and Economy. Fraunhofer IGD was prominently present with a live demonstration of CultLab3D.

Digital Technologies such as smartphones and tablet-PCs have become common presence in our daily lives. The 2014 science year is concerned with the consequences and the future of the development of digital societies in Germany.

Representatives from research and education discuss how individuals change and adapt to new technologies as well as changes in our society and which challenges arise that fall into the three main action lines: "digital cooperation – digital economy – digital knowledge". Fraunhofer IGD helps laying the foundation for the digital society and presentedCultLab3D, the world-wide first approach to fast and economic 3D mass digitization of cultural heritage artefacts. The Science Years are an initiative of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research together with Science in Dialogue (WiD=Wissenschaft im Dialog). The Science Years support knowledge and information exchange between public and research since 2000.

28.10.2013

CultLab3D won the "2013 DigitalHeritage International Congress and V-MUST.NET" award for the best technology exhibit

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CultLab3D gewann den 2013 'DigitalHeritage International Congress and V-MUST.NET'-Preis für das technisch beste Exponat.
CultLab3D gewann den 2013 'DigitalHeritage International Congress and V-MUST.NET'-Preis für das technisch beste Exponat.

CultLab3D is funded by the federal ministry for economics and technology and was presented for the first time at the Digital Heritage 2013 Conference (28 Oct. through 1 Nov. 2013) in Marseille under the patronage of UNESCO.

The biggest event yet on the subject of Digital Cultural Heritage gathered around 700 representatives from research and education, industry and politics to discuss and present digital technologies for the preservation, documentation and under-standing of cultural heritage. The associated exhibition was accessible to the public and recorded more than 6000 visitors. There, CultLab3D won the "2013 DigitalHeritage International Congress and V-MUST.NET" award for the best technology exhibit.

Fraunhofer IGD is the world's leading institute for applied research in Visual Computing. Visual Computing is image- and model-based information technology. It includes computer graphics, computer vision, as well as virtual and augmented reality.


CultLab3D_Fraunhofer-Forscher sichern Kulturerbe digital_Fraunhofer IGD (Ausschnitt), © Fraunhofer IGD h_presse_cultlab3d_1, CultLab3D in der Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung. Scan des 'Apoll vom Belvedere' (1497/98) von Antico, Foto: Norbert Miguletz, © Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung lh_presse_cultlab3d_2, CultLab3D in der Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung. Scan des 'Apoll vom Belvedere' (1497/98) von Antico, Foto: Norbert Miguletz, © Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung 3-D-Scan_Teststrecke_3, © Carola Radke/MfN 3-D-Scan_Teststrecke_2, © Carola Radke/MfN